Build A Fullproof Writing Strategy

While I’m a stickler for effective writing, I quite understand that it comes with hard-nosed strategies. (The primary being PRACTICE).

What’s your writing strategy?

Artists can get bored with doing what we love routinely. The boredom spells higher for writers because we deal more with words. And we always need them to change.

If there was a strategy – like there are for many stuffs these days – for combating your writing hitches, wouldn’t you take a jump at it?

A couple pro writers and authors employ interestingly different strategies that work wonders for them.

•John Grisham writes a page each day
•Dan Brown gets up by five each morning to write when he ducked into writing full-time
•Robert Ludlum wrote profusely at different times of the day.
•Mary Higgins Clark wrote from 5am-7am daily, and edited each chapter of her books on first draft.
•Jeff Goins suggests writing at least 500 words each day

What’s your strategy?

For young wanna-bes, it’s best to start at a place that’s small, then build from there. It’s safer to build confidence slowly doing what you love than to burn out quick for care of writing a lot.

And really, all that effective and better writing is about isn’t voluminous writings, but writing frequently.

Want to embrace a fullproof writing strategy? Check out these simple but result-getting steps:

Get up early. Write when the world’s still asleep. It keeps your head out of the buzz and helps you stay focused writing. Plus, it’s a good excuse for writing everyday.

Stay up to brainstorm. It’s beautiful to brainstorm for ideas, if possible, the night before. Highlight your writing plan for the following day. I love to stay up reading blogs, books, anything that keeps me updated about my niche. I love to go to bed knowing I’ve learned something that adds to my wisdom.

Capture ideas during the day. That means you’ll observe as you live. What does the queue at the bank have to teach you? The bald man who couldn’t wait his turn? These ideas often turn out to infuse our works with live and interesting characters.

Keep journals. Record thoughts and words that come to you on the whim. That means you’ll go about with a recording medium to help keep you at par with the craft. Plus, when you’ve got the chance, you could scribble some about the book you’re working on. Writing can be done almost anywhere.

Read blogs. For each post I write, I read at least two blogs. This is intended to get my writing juice up and get the words out fresh and ready.

Decongest. Every hard worker understands the importance of ‘decongesting’. You’ve got learn to rest, take a break, to regain mental strength and capture. It’s just plain implausible to expect that little or no rest will yield a greater output for you.

Outline. Write out the headline for your writing first. Break the body into outlines, if you know them. Then move over to writing a smashing conclusion. Begin to connect the dots from beginning, starting with a few words that hints the theme of the write-up.

And here’s a bonus that helps get your writing kick going.

      Tips on Writing Better

1. Write in bits when you’re less inspired and blocked. Basically, to clear the clog in your head and keep you focused writing.

2. Read like you’ve got a train coming at you. Read a lot, I mean. To widen your scope and give details to your work. Good reading reflects in your writings as much as poor reading does.

2. Document every idea. Every lost idea is a gem lost. Evernote is a solid tool for doing. I use it too. Treasure the idea that slams at you at unexpected moments by writing them down or recording them immediately. That ‘simple’ sentence could be a start for a white paper, a manifesto or even a best-seller book.

3. Every great writing goes through copious rewriting. You should never think of settling on your first draft. The best writers (so to speak) know to cut, and cut and keep cutting till just the best work comes out. Writing may never be finished, but it sure doesn’t have to bore when read.

4. You need a merciless cutter. Get an editor. I suggest a peer editor, for a start. Someone who becomes your reader and tells you the truth however hard(your spouse, maybe). You’ve got to be told your work sucks to realise you’re truly cut out for this. Permit your works to be critiqued and enjoy doing so.

5. Stick to writing everyday. All great feats come with consistent practice. And writing everyday does the same. It gets you more acquainted with the craft and grants quick mastery. Remember the good ol’ rule: You get better only on the job!

6. Live. Really, live. This is about the most essential as every great writing buries itself in the experience of the writer. People want to read about a life that’s been lived. Not an opinion that’s not tested. And to write effectively, get the experience. The experience comes from living. Go ahead and fail, and see what lesson it teaches you, and how it could help your audience. Hike. Visit the zoo. Take the family out. Eat out and see how annoying some folks could be in a restaurant. Recapture your life through living and experiences.

*Photo Credit: RealPen


I guess there are more ways to build a fullproof writing strategy. Which strategies do you employ? Share your comments below.

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Hi. I’m Yusuff Busayo, a Writer, Book-craze, Speaker (among other stuffs). I inspire people to Write, Create and Make Impact. Check out my about page for details about this blog. Or connect with me on Facebook, Twitter, Google+.

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